6 Responses

  1. Justin Hoenke
    Justin Hoenke October 21, 2011 at 12:07 pm | | Reply

    What I’d like to see:

    1. Libraries buying ebooks from the publishers themselves (and actually owning the ebooks).

    2. Libraries hiring “geeks” (programmers, developers, etc) to create software/programs/apps/whatever to store these ebooks and allow patrons to access them.

    I feel like this would throw a wrench in a lot of people’s plans to cut libraries out of the market and makes patrons into customers.

    1. David Sandford
      David Sandford October 30, 2011 at 11:45 pm | | Reply

      I agree with Justin. I would like the libraries to move into private ownership of the digital titles.

      As it stands now the libraries are being forced to further the commercial model of Amazon, and are also limited in the titles we can put into our collections by Overdrive.

      I would like to be able to add titles to the collection that Overdrive doesn’t handle, such as those by Baen Books.

      I’d also like to be able to have a few books for people with readers that prefer other formats like Lit, PDF, TXT,etc. (I have a really nice eReader that likes TXT files best – runs on AA batteries, great for camping).

      However neither of these options are currently available.

  2. Erik Christopher
    Erik Christopher October 24, 2011 at 8:18 am | | Reply

    The one challenge with going direct to publisher is that many aren’t setup to work with or sell to libraries. You could buy the eBook and then just use it how you want via adobe digital editions, which isn’t great, but once publishers understand you want to use it in a library setting, they’ll want to know how it is being used, etc.

    For some content they have agreements with authors, illustrators and others that limit how the content can be used.

    Aggregators help, especially in Higher Ed and Public library areas, it’s a matter of understanding whether you license the content, own it in perpetuity, any dark archive, the list goes on. The larger question has to be how will this help your patrons and will developing your own system be cost prohibitive, which unless you mod something together, would be yes and you take on a whole new responsibility for controlling the use of the content which involves being liable for misuse.

    Just some thoughts.

    Erik

  3. Paul
    Paul October 25, 2011 at 8:24 pm | | Reply

    Aggregators help, especially in Higher Ed and Public library areas, it’s a matter of understanding whether you license the content, own it in perpetuity, any dark archive, the list goes on. The larger question has to be how will this help your patrons and will developing your own system be cost prohibitive, which unless you mod something together, would be yes and you take on a whole new responsibility for controlling the use of the content which involves being liable for misuse.
    +1

Leave a Reply

Optimization WordPress Plugins & Solutions by W3 EDGE